Mots difficiles en anglais

ill-fated

funeste , infortuné. Ill-fated expedition, ill-fated attempt.

to woo

courtiser, faire la cour à, chercher à plaire à. « How shall I woo her ? » « The candidate tries to woo reluctant Millennials. »

to imbue

to imbue sth with sth = insuffler qch à qch. « A brief to imbue the brand with a subtler, more aristocratic vibe. »
to imbue sb with +feeling] = remplir qn de. « His presence imbued her with a feeling of security. »
to be imbued with a feeling = être pénétré d'un sentiment. « An officer imbued with a sense of duty. »

bailout

sauvetage ; renflouement ; remise à flot. « The company survived thanks to the bailout. »
bailout plan = plan de sauvetage

groundbreakin

révolutionnaire ; novateur ; innovant ; historique. A groundbreaking novel ; groundbreaking research.

scent

odeur, parfum. « The scent of flowers. » « She wears too much scent. »
to be on the scent of sth = être sur une piste.
to be on the scent of sth big = être sur un gros coup
to throw sb off the scent = lancer qn sur une mauvaise piste
to scent = parfumer ; flairer

allure

attrait « The allure of Egypt » « It's a game that has really lost its allure. »
charme « The captivating allure of Isabelle Adjani. »
sexual allure = pouvoir de séduction « A wily, low-born governess who uses her sexual allure to climb the society ladder. »

to yearn

désirer vivement (qch) « He yearned for freedom. » « I yearned to see her again. »

hectic

trépidant « I have a very hectic life. »
mouvementé « It has been pretty hectic during the past couple of years. »

brook

ruisseau (=stream) « little brooks make great rivers. »

nimble

agile « everything had been stitched by Molly's nimble fingers. »        
vif « if they want to keep their minds nimble, they must use them. »        
nimble-fingered = aux doigts agiles  
nimble-footed = au pied léger  
nimbleness = agilité, vivacité

fuzzy

flou « the picture came out fuzzy »
crépu « he's the one with fuzzy red hair »
confus « he had little patience for fuzzy ideas. »

devoid of

dépourvu de « A face that was devoid of feeling » « He was devoid of any talent whatsoever. »

acorn

acorngland (de chêne). « Acorns will germinate and grow into oaks. »

to hatch

[chick, egg] éclore « She stays in the nest until the chicks hatch »
to be hatched = éclos « The young disappeared soon after they were hatched. »
[+scheme, plot] tramer « What if the 9/11 conspiracy were actually hatched in Washington DC, at the highest leves of the US governement? »

nosey, nosy

curieux → « those nosey neighbours ; don't be so nosey! »

realm

royaume
domaine → public opinion plays a vital role in the political realm → the realm of politics = le domaine de la politique → it's not beyond the realms of possibility = c'est du domaine du possible.

arson

arsonincendie criminel. « He was charged with arson. »

awkward

gauche, maladroit, malhabile, emprunté, gênant.
to feel awkward = se sentir mal à l'aise.
awkward situation = situation gênante.

hug

hugétreinte
to hug = étreindre

swagger

fam.: démarche, style « You have charisma, confidence, you have swagger. » «  He has the look and swagger of a Hollywood star. »
to swagger : plastronner, rouler les mécaniques
with a swagger = en plastronnant « he walked with a swagger. »
swag = style ; butin

posh

chic « a posh hotel » « a posh dinner party » « I wouldn't have thought she had such posh friends. » « He sounded so posh on the phone. »
to talk posh = parler d'une manière affectée.

hearts, clubs, diamonds, spades

coeurs, trèfles, carreaux, piques (cartes) « The ace of hearts, the king of clubs, the queen of diamonds and the jack of spades » : l'as de coeur, le roi de trèfle, la reine de carreau, et le valet de pique

clover

trèfle  four-leaf clover = trèfle à quatre feuilles
to be in clover = être comme un coq en pâte
à ne pas confondre avec "clubs"(aux cartes) « the king of clubs »

coarse

grossier, épais, dru. Coarse cloth, skin, hair, grass.
grossier, vulgaire (=foul-mouthed) « He objected to her coarse and offensive remarks » « A rather coarse fellow. »
coarse fishing = pêche à la ligne.

foul

infect, immonde, affreux « The weather was foul » « What a foul smell! » « He was in a foul mood » « I've had a really foul day at work. »
[language] ordurier « I won't have you using such foul language in my house! »
by fair means or foul = par n'importe quel moyen.
faute (de jeu). To commit a foul on sb. « He was sent off for fouling the goalkeeper. »
to cry foul = crier à l'injustice « Tourists cry foul as euro pushes up cost of holidays. »
to foul = polluer, souiller « Two oil spills near Los Angeles have fouled the ocean. »
to foul up = bloquer « It is raining again this morning which will foul up traffic. »
foul-mouthed = grossier « that fat, racist, foul-mouth friend of yours. »
foul play = jeu irrégulier « Players were warned twice for foul play. » Meurtre « Foul play is not suspected. »
foul-smelling = puant
foul-tasting = infect
foul-tempered = d'un caractère de cochon
foul-up = cafouillage « A series of technical foul-ups delayed the launch of the new product. »
professional foul = faute délibérée.

stamina

endurance « I have always admired the strength and stamina of dancers. » « Shopping is a woman's game. It requires unlimited stamina. »

layman

profane (=non-expert) « The mere mention of the words `heart failure', can conjure up, to the layman, the prospect of imminent death. »        
in layman's terms = en langage de tous les jours, en termes profanes « explaining scientific breakthroughs in layman's terms. »

knavish

de filou « I should not have thought that at your age you would be capable of such a knavish trick. »

frailty

faiblesse « a triumph of will over human frailty. » « the frailties of human nature. »
fragilité « She died after a long period of increasing frailty. » 

to wrestle

lutter corps à corps « He leapt onto the vehicle and wrestled (with) the driver. »
to wrestle with sth [+problem, question] se débattre avec qch. « He wrestled with the decision for several weeks, wondering what he should do. »
to arm-wrestle (with sb) = faire un bras de fer (avec qn). « Did any of you boys ever arm-wrestle? »

distressing

pénible, bouleversant « Some viewers may find these scenes distressing. » « Seeing your baby vomit can be very distressing. » « Tranquillizers help alleviate the distressing symptoms of anxiety. »

bespoke

sur commande, sur mesure « A bespoke service » « A bespoke dinner jacket. »

ravenous

affamé « I'm ravenous all of the time. »
to be ravenous = avoir une faim de loup.

logging

loggingexploitation forestière. A logging company.

rein

rêne « She gripped the reins tightly. »
to give sb free rein = donner carte blanche à qn « The government gave free rein to the private sector in transport. »
to keep a tight rein on sth = exercer un contrôle strict sur qch « The Government is keeping a tight rein on public expenditure. »        

to rein in = réfréner « He has had to rein in his enthusiasm. » « The government finally reined in inflation by sending interest rates soaring. »

manure

manurefumier
manure heap = tas de fumier
horse manure = crottin de cheval

errand

errand course, commission « She went downtown to do errands. »  
to go on an errand, to run errands = faire une/des courses.

ferris wheel

ferris wheelgrande roue (=big wheel). « Are you ready to go on the Ferris wheel? »

valediction

adieu « A glorious valediction. »

forehead

front « High forehead, thin lips, clean-shaven. »

ear

oreille
épi « ear of wheat. »

conversely

inversement, réciproquement, au contraire « I was a contented child. Axel, conversely, was a very unhappy boy. »

stocking

stockingbas. « a pair of stockings »

steadfast

ferme, résolu « We are grateful that God remains steadfast in his love for us. »

reckless

téméraire « She was reckless and utterly without fear. »
with reckless abandon = avec témérité « I was on my dirt bike, barreling down a gravel road full speed with the reckless abandon that only a 13-year-old boy could have. »

freak

bête curieuse. « A woman was then considered a freak if she put her career first. »
maniaque → health freak = obsédé de la santé ; fitness freak = sportif acharné
insolite. « He broke his leg in a freak accident, playing golf. »
to go crazy, péter un plomb, péter un câble. « I freaked when I first found out. »
to freak out = flipper, stresser « I remember the first time I went onstage. I freaked out completely. »
to freak sb out = déboussoler qn « I think our music freaks people out sometimes... »

boast

to boast = se vanter (=to brag) « Stop boasting! »
to boast about sth = se vanter de qch. « Carol boasted about her costume. »
to boast of/that = se vanter de « He boasted of being involved in the arms theft. » « He boasted that he was someone great. »    
vantardise « This isn't meant as a boast » « her boast of being a great lover. »

to brag

se vanter (=to boast) « He'll probably go around bragging to his friends. »
to brag about sth = se vanter de qch « I didn't brag about the salary. »

apace

rapidement « My teacher helped me moving along apace. » « Negotiations were continuing apace. »
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