Mots difficiles en anglais

appalling

[conditions, weather, injuries, tragedy] épouvantable
[stupidity, ignorance, behaviour] affligeant « their appalling ignorance about basic hygiene » « She's an appalling cook » (= elle est très mauvaise cuisinière).

dreadful

[weather] affreux « The weather was dreadful »
[mistake] terrible « a dreadful mistake »
[news, situation] terrible, affreux « They told us the dreadful news » My « financial situation is dreadful. » (=appalling)
You look dreadful = Tu as une mine affreuse.

jug

pot, cruche
nichon « Look at those Jugs! »

bald

chauve « He is going bald. »

sparrow

moineau 

hasty

[departure, return] précipité « a hasty departure »  « his hasty return to work after his hospital stay »  
[decision, conclusion] hâtif « I don't want to make any hasty decisions about my future. » « don't be hasty » (=ne prend pas de décision hâtive)
to beat a hasty retreat = prendre ses jambes à son cou

to expel

chasser, expulser « Peasants were expelled from their villages. »
renvoyer, exclure « He had been expelled from his previous school for stealing. »

bookworm

dévoreur de livres, rat  m  de bibliothèque

to unravel

(se) démêler, (se) défaire « He could unravel a knot that others wouldn't even attempt. »
(se) dénouer « Carter was still trying to unravel the truth of the woman's story » « She is trying to unravel the mystery of her husband's disappearance. » « Gradually, James' story unravels. »

scamp

voyou « you are such a scamp! »

wig

perruque

to be neck and neck

[horses, runners, competitors] être au coude à coude « They were neck and neck right up to the finishing line. » « Democrats Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton are running neck-and-neck in California »

dove

colombe

suck up

lèche-cul, fayot
to suck up to = fayoter « Now that he's the boss they're all sucking up to him, hoping to get big raises. »

to bug

  [+room] poser des micros dans « He heard that they were planning to bug his office. »
[+phone] brancher sur table d'écoute « I found out my phone was bugged. »
embêter, casser les pieds à « That's what bugs me about the whole business. » « I only did it to bug my parents »

kidney

rein « He's got kidney trouble » (=il a des problèmes de reins)
kidney disease = maladie rénale
kidney failure = insuffisance rénale

to outwit

se montrer plus malin que « To win the presidency he had first to outwit his rivals »

stuffed

[person] gavé (=full up) « But you're just so stuffed you won't be able to drink anything. »
  to be stuffed full =  être bourré  à craquer « his wallet was stuffed full. »

to meddle

s'en mêler « It's best not to meddle. »
to meddle in sth = se mêler de qch « What had induced the woman to meddle in his affairs? »
to meddle with sth = se mêler de qch « I dared not meddle with my wife's plans. »

backlash

réaction violente « There will be a huge public backlash if the match is called off.  The Government will face a backlash from unions. »

head over heels

éperduement
« to fall head over heels in love » = tomber éperduement amoureux

blender

mixeur « Put all the ingredients in a blender. »

flake

faux jeton, tire-au-flanc : « John called in sick to work again today. He's such a flake. » « Mary said she would do the research for our project, but it's been a week and she hasn't done a thing. She's such a flake. »

shorty

(jolie) fille, gonzesse, petite amie « Yo shorty, it's your birthday »

cunning

rusé, malin « on their second raid they were more cunning. »  
[device, idea] astucieux
astuce , ruse (péj.) « they achieved their aim by stealth and cunning. »

clutch

étreinte, prise
serrer fort the boy's mother was sitting clutching a handkerchief.   
to clutch at sth  = se cramponner à qch Ella stood outside, vainly trying to clutch at the door handle
  (fig)  sauter sur qch She would have clutched at any excuse to miss school for the day.   
[+car] embrayage (clutch pedal) « Gently release the clutch pedal until you feel the car trying to pull away. »

pushy

insistant « a pushy, aggressive door-to-door salesman. » « We didn't want to seem to be pushy parents. »

to pass along

faire passer « he lit a joint a passed it along. » « It was the first time that this magazine was passed along to me. »

by hook or by crook

coûte que coûte « I'll get there by hook or crook. »

off the hook

trop cool « That party was off the hook! » (=off the chain « this party is really off the chain!! »)
to get off the hook = se tirer d'affaire « Government officials accused of bribery and corruption often get off the hook. »   
to let sb off the hook = laisser qn s'en tirer « the Opposition has let the government off the hook »
  to take the phone off the hook = décrocher le téléphone

relentless

implacable « the pressure now was relentless.  The relentless heat of the desert. » (=la chaleur implacable du désert).
[rain] continuel(le)  
  [person, enemy, pursuit] implacable (=never giving up) « He was relentless in his pursuit of quality » « He was the most relentless enemy I have ever known »

to screen

masquer
protéger « I moved in front of her trying to screen her.  The house is screened from the road by high hedges. She screened her eyes from the wind. »
[+film] projeter , diffuser « The series is likely to be screened in January. »
  [+candidates, employees] contrôler « The Secret Service screens several hundred people every week »    « women screened for breast cancer »
[+telephone calls] filtrer « I employ a secretary to screen my telephone calls »

downtime

temps d'arrêt « I was so tired, I decided I needed to have a little downtime. »

off the top of my head

de tête « off the top of my head, here are a few examples » (=de tête, voici quelques exemples).
= OTTOMH « I don't remember details ottomh, but... »

off the record

officieux « The minister's remarks were strictly off-the-record. »

boarding school

pensionnat « They sent their children to boarding school. » 

nifty

  [car, jacket, bag] qui a du chic, qui a de la classe (=stylish)
[place] chouette « Bridgeport was a pretty nifty place »
[gadget, tool] astucieux « this nifty Add-On lets you search our full database from your browser » « a couple of nifty tricks that I've seen scattered around the Internet. »

scramble

bousculade  « There was a mad scramble for the back seat. » (=il y eut une folle bousculade pour la place du fond.)
lutte « in their scramble for top spot in the charts » (=dans leur lutte pour la première place au hit-parade).
the scramble for jobs = la ruée sur les emplois
avancer péniblement « Tourists were scrambling over the rocks. » (= les touristes avançaient péniblement dans les rochers).
to scramble for   [+door, exit] se ruer vers « I scrambled for the door »
to scramble for   [+tickets, shares, prize] s'arracher « More than three million fans are expected to scramble for tickets. »
[+signal, message] brouiller
[+eggs] brouiller

cramp

crampe  « I had the most excruciating cramp in my leg. »
génant (=awkward)  « when u get 2 people in a room who dont like each other, its cramp, for u and for them. »  « I caught my brother havin sex... ahhhh, cramp! »
to cramp sb's style = priver qn de ses moyens « He thinks marriage would cramp his style. »

tiptoe

on tiptoe = sur la pointe des pieds « They stretched their arms and stood on tiptoe. »
to tiptoe= marcher sur la pointe des pieds « He tiptoed out of the room » (=il sortit de la chambre sur la pointe des pieds). « she tiptoed to the window » (=elle alla à la fenêtre sur la pointe des pieds).

to skulk

se cacher « They were skulking in a corner ».   
to skulk off = s'en aller en douce

chuckle

glousser « the joke made me chuckle
»

to wind

[+rope, bandage] to wind sth around sth = enrouler qch autour de qch → « wind the wire round the screws. → She wound the bandage around his knee. »
[+clock, toy] remonter → « he stopped to wind his watch. »
[road, river] serpenter → to wind through sth = serpenter à travers qch → « The river winds through the town. → The road winds through the valley. »

cranky

[idea] excentrique, loufoque
grincheux, revêche (=bad-tempered) there was no point in being cranky and not talking to him Why are you so cranky today? Did you wake up on the wrong side of the bed?

wrangle

bataille → « a contractual wrangle between a football club and a player → he was involved in a legal wrangle with his cousin. »
to wrangle = se disputer → to wrangle with sb over sth (=se battre contre qn au sujet de qch) → « she had wrangled bitterly with her ex-husband over contact with their children. »

jam

confiture « strawberry jam »
[+shoppers] cohue
traffic jam = bouchon
to be in a jam = être dans le pétrin « I'm in a real jam, I've got an important meeting at 9 and the damned car won't start. » « He finds himself in exactly the same jam as his brother was in ten years ago. »
to get sb out of a jam = « tirer qn du pétrin »
encombrer, obstruer, saturer crowds jammed the streets. « The office phone lines are jammed by callers opposed to the sale. TV viewers jammed BBC switchboards to complain. »

to soak

tremper → « water came in the tent and soaked both sleeping bags. »
[+dishes, pots] faire tremper, laisser tremper → « soak the material in bleach for several hours. »

there's a catch

c'est une attrape; il y a anguille sous roche « you can fly Skybus for 10 bucks, but there's a catch! »
cf.: pitfall piège, chausse-trape « The pitfalls of working abroad are numerous. »

shifty

[person, behaviour] louche « he looked shifty » (il avait l'air louche).
[eyes] fuyant

from the get go

from the start, since the begining (=since the get go)
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